Despite its importance and potential for developing the understanding and approaches necessary to tackle the complex social justice and environmental problems of today, the field of ethnobiology is chronically under-funded and under-supported. The ISE Institutional Fellowships are intended to fill this gap and support the strategic, conceptual and applied development of ethnobiology within academic institutions. In the past, the Institutional Fellowship Program supported a Fellow based at Oxford University in the UK, following the efforts by Darrell Posey to build capacity in this field within this institution. Our goal, subject to raising funds, is to develop a program that can make modest but strategically timed and directed investments in particular individuals and institutions in order to strengthen the field and its direct applications in both developed and developing countries, with an emphasis in bio-culturally diverse settings.

Past Institutional Fellow

Dr. Jan Salick (Darrell Posey Institutional Fellow 2005-2007) in Tibet, where she was working during her two-year exchange at Oxford University

Dr. Jan Salick (Darrell Posey Institutional Fellow 2005-2007) in Tibet, where she was working during her two-year exchange at Oxford University

Dr. Jan Salick (Darrell Posey Senior Fellow, Oxford University, 2005-2007) is an ethnoecologist with extensive work and field experience in Peru, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Borneo and the eastern Himalayas on issues ranging from indigenous agriculture, forestry and resource managemen to non-timber forest products and medicinal plants. During her stay at Oxford she focused on the Tibetan Ethnoecology and Traditional Resource Rights project, working with local groups to strengthen traditional ecological knowledge and traditional resource rights, applying these to pressing conservation and sustainable development problems in the region. During this time she collaborated with a wide range of University departments and institutes in order to help build the field of ethnoecology, including: the Centre for Brazilian Studies, the Department of Plant Sciences, the Environmental Change Institute, Queen Elizabeth House, the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, and Green College.